‘Smokin’ Rockets!’

Photo by Sue Suchyta Sharon Clarke of Lincoln Park, who said her mother's brother married Lyn “Buddy” Osborne's sister, said she remembered meeting Osborn once in 1953, when she was 5 years old. Osborne, who was raised in Lincoln Park, played Cadet Happy from 1950 to 1955 on “Space Patrol.” The star died in 1958 from a brain tumor. The display runs through Jan. 30 at the Lincoln Park Historical Museum, 1335 Southfield Road, which is open 1 to 6 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Photo by Sue Suchyta
Sharon Clarke of Lincoln Park, who said her mother’s brother married Lyn “Buddy” Osborne’s sister, said she remembered meeting Osborn once in 1953, when she was 5 years old. Osborne, who was raised in Lincoln Park, played Cadet Happy from 1950 to 1955 on “Space Patrol.” The star died in 1958 from a brain tumor. The display runs through Jan. 30 at the Lincoln Park Historical Museum, 1335 Southfield Road, which is open 1 to 6 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

By SUE SUCHYTA
Sunday Times Newspapers

LINCOLN PARK – Blast back in time with the Lincoln Park Historical Museum as it displays memorabilia from the family of the late Lyn “Buddy” Osborn, who played Cadet Happy on “Space Patrol.”

Osborn, who was raised in Lincoln Park and graduated from Lincoln Park High School, co-starred from 1950 to 1955 in the live coast-to-coast science fiction television show.

He also appeared in a number of science fiction film before his untimely death in 1958 from a brain tumor.

Downriver, “Buddy,” as he was known, had a reputation as a cut-up, and he and his older sister, Beth, were active in local theatrical productions.

After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Osborn returned home and worked odd jobs, which included a stint in as a stand-up comedy in Detroit at the Empress Theatre on Woodward.

Osborn then moved to California, where he studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse for three years. When he neared completion of the program, he was offered a role on the science fiction television series “Space Patrol,” a spinoff of two earlier series, “Tom Corbett, Space Cadet” and “Captain Video and his Video Rangers.”

As Cadet Happy, he played sidekick to Commander-in-Chief Edward “Buzz” Corry, played by actor Ed Kemmer, as the two traveled the universe in the 30th century fighting space bad guys on behalf of the United Planets.

The 1950s was an era fascinated with the prospect of exploring space, and Osborn went on to appear in a number of science fiction-themed films, B-movies in which the special effects were low budget, and unintentionally humorous to present-day audiences.

Osborne appeared in “The Cosmic Man,” “The Amazing Colossal Man” and “Invasion of the Saucer Men.”

The exhibit runs through Jan. 30, and part of the display will remain a permanent fixture of the museum, 1335 Southfield Road, which is open 1 to 6 p.m.Wednesday and Saturday.

For more information, call 313-386-3137, contact lpmuseum@gmail.com, or visit the Facebook page Smokin’ Rockets with Lyn Osborn.

(Sue Suchyta can be reached at sue.suchyta@yahoo.com.)