Kibby tells RTAB: Water main replacement ‘desperately needed’

Photo by Sue Suchyta from video. Department of Treasury official Patrick Dostine (left) listens to City Administrator Mark Kibby explain the Warwick and Arlington water main replacement project to the Receivership Transition Advisory Board.

Photo by Sue Suchyta from video. Department of Treasury official Patrick Dostine (left) listens to City Administrator Mark Kibby explain the Warwick and Arlington water main replacement project to the Receivership Transition Advisory Board.

By SUE SUCHYTA
Sunday Times Newspapers

ALLEN PARK – City Administrator Mark Kibby told the Receivership Transition Advisory Board that the water main replacement project for Warwick and Arlington avenues is “desperately needed” to reduce ongoing repair costs.

Warwick between Arno and Allen roads has had 32 breaks in 1,800 feet of main, while Arlington Avenue between Watson and Shenandoah has experienced 37 breaks in 1,300 feet of main.

Kibby said when a water main break is repaired the sleeves used to repair sections are 18 to 36 inches long, and both of the lines have been repaired with numerous sleeves. He said a repair costs on average $4,000 to $5,000 per break.

“We’ve got a lot of money tied up in breaks, so this will really help reduce those costs, then we can focus on some other areas,” Kibby said.

The RTAB members in attendance voted unanimously to approve the expenditure for the water main replacement project.

Kibby said Allen Park will seek funding for pressure relief valves from Grants for Distressed Cities, which are available on the state and federal level.

Pressure relief valves can help reduce the water pressure going to the older water main lines. When the Great Lakes Water Authority in Detroit increases water pressure in response to the demands of customers further out, the pipes of geographically closer customers bear more of the brunt of the pressure.

“It will help dial (the pressure) down a little bit, so that these lines that are 80 to 90 years old aren’t taking the up-and-down fluctuations of those pressures,” Kibby said.

The cost of the Warwick and Arlington Project will be about $744,000, with $600,000 coming from the fiscal year 2016-17 water and sewer fund, and $174,000 reallocated from the budget for a new Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system.

A SCADA system uses coded signals over communication channels to capture information about remote equipment or recording devices. It can be used to monitor infrastructure data, including water treatment, distribution and waste water collection and treatment.

Kibby said the SCADA system request for quotation received only one bid, and it was much higher than anticipated, so city official chose at this time to reject it.

(Sue Suchyta can be reached at sue.suchyta@yahoo.com.)