Interactive 3-D display details inner workings of the human brain

Photo by Zeinab Najm. Dearborn resident and patient Jacquelyn Bell (left) and Beaumont Hospital-Dearborn Neurologist Dr. Daniel Singer study the causes and symptoms of headaches displayed on a 3-D interactive brain.

Photo by Zeinab Najm. Dearborn resident and patient Jacquelyn Bell (left) and Beaumont Hospital-Dearborn Neurologist Dr. Daniel Singer study the causes and symptoms of headaches displayed on a 3-D interactive brain.

By ZEINAB NAJM
Times-Herald Newspapers

DEARBORN — A large scale 3-D brain sits in the atrium of Beaumont Hospital-Dearborn, 18101 Oakwood Blvd., serving as an education tool for trauma, disease and neurological issues.

Visitors can literally step inside the brain to learn about the various structures and normal functions throughout the organ.

Examples explained on the display include meningitis, cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s disease, strokes, aneurysms, Alzheimer’s disease, concussions, trauma and tumors.

The example for headaches was the highlight Sept. 15 as a Beaumont patient struggling with migraines shared her story.

Dearborn resident Jacquelyn Bell said she has suffered from headaches since she was in high school and recently have affected her home and work life.

After trying multiple oral medications, yoga, acupuncture, oils and therapy, she went to Beaumont after hearing about her friend who sought treatment at the hospital.

Bell has been receiving Botox injections from Beaumont Hospital-Dearborn Neurologist Dr. Daniel Singer for 18 months and has seen an 80 percent decrease in pain.

“I come in every 13 weeks for 30 minutes, and get the injection on the top of my forehead, temples, base of skull and neck,” she said. “The treatment alleviates headaches making them less frequent.”

Singer said the injection sites follow the studied migraine origin patterns.
“Botox paralyzes the muscle,” he said. “It decreases the negative feedback inhibition to the back of the brain.”

Patients who suffer from chronic daily migraines, less than 15 days a month, have seen a decrease in headache frequency after injection Singer said.

Bell said her stress is a trigger of the headaches so the treatment aids in allowing her to function as a normal person with friends and family.

“It’s amazing not to be miserable 24/7, especially if you don’t know any different,” she said.

The display will be in the atrium of the hospital until the end of the month to educate about diseases and serve as a fun, helpful way to teach how the brain works.

(Zeinab Najm can be reached at zeinabnajm92@gmail.com.)

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