Flood tapped to investigate Flint water crisis

Photo courtesy of Flood Law. Todd Law was appointed Jan. 25 by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette to spearhead the Flint water crisis investigation. Flood, a former Allen Park resident and city attorney, is charged with seeing if and what laws were violated leading to lead-filled water.

Photo courtesy of Flood Law. Todd Law was appointed Jan. 25 by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette to spearhead the Flint water crisis investigation. Flood, a former Allen Park resident and city attorney, is charged with seeing if and what laws were violated leading to lead-filled water.

By TEREASA NIMS
Sunday Times Newspapers

ALLEN PARK – Former resident and city attorney Todd Flood was appointed Jan. 25 to special counsel by the Michigan Attorney General to spearhead the Flint water crisis investigation.

“This is my case,” Flood said after the announcement by Attorney General Bill Schuette Monday. “This is my life right now.”

A former Wayne County prosecutor, Flood, said he will maintain his Royal Oak firm, Flood Law, and will only be handling a few cases which he already has.

Councilman Harry Sisko said former Emergency Manager Joyce Parker removed Flood as city attorney and brought in the Pentiuk, Couvreur & Kobiljak, PC group. The Sisko noted the irony during Tuesday’s city council meeting how Parker removed Flood, who was born and raised in Allen Park, and then the Michigan Attorney General appoints him.

He further commented on the Flood’s job. Sisko said Flint reportedly pulled away from the Detroit Water — to save money, which it was paying $2.1 million per month. He said then it was discovered that the Detroit Water offered a 50 percent reduction in cost and Flint still pulled out.

“What is the real motivation then?” asked Sisko. “If it was really saving money.”

That is part of what Schuette vowed to find out in early January when he announced the investigation. Schuette said he wanted to find out what, if any, state laws were violated leading to the lead in the water.

He appointed Flood along with retired Detroit FBI head Andy Arena to take the reins of the investigation to answer those questions.

Schuette said he isn’t speculating how long the investigation will take, but said Monday it will be “thorough, exhaustive and complete.”

In April 2014 Flint switched from the Detroit Water and Sewage System to using Flint River water. Last February, elevated levels of lead were found in that water. In September an independent test revealed alarming levels of lead in children’s blood.

More than two years after the switch, Gov. Rick Snyder declared a state of emergency in regards to the water.

Since the declaration, Flint residents have been using water filters and bottled water, which has been donated from throughout the state.

(Tereasa Nims can be reached at dstreporter@gmail.com.)

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