Eagle Scout project helps students with team-building skills  

Photo courtesy of Dearborn Heights Montessori Center. Students at DHMC use the newly completed low ropes course during physical education to learn team building skills.

Photo courtesy of Dearborn Heights Montessori Center. Students at DHMC use the newly completed low ropes course during physical education to learn team building skills.

HEIGHTS – There was immediate applause from Dearborn Heights Montessori Center middle school students when alumnus Cameron Kabacinski walked through their classroom this month in preparation for a special ribbon cutting outdoors on the school campus.

Months earlier, Kabacinski approached Kay Neff, DHMC head of school, for permission to design and build a low ropes course for students.

Kabacinski attended DHMC from preschool through eighth grade. He recalled going to an annual camp as an upper elementary student where using a low ropes course helped foster team-building skills.

“I spent most of my school years at Dearborn Heights Montessori, and wanted to do something to give back to my community,” said Kabacinski, a Dearborn Heights resident and member of Dearborn area Boy Scout Troop 1151.

The project would help him complete requirements to become a third generation Eagle Scout.

“I’ve worked with a lot of contractors over the years,” Neff said, “and I’ve met very few who have done as much research and were as detailed and professional as Cameron was in his presentation. We were delighted to accept his proposal.”

Using team-building skills developed through school and scouting, Kabacinski assembled a team of 20 people, including fellow Scouts of Troop 1151 and several family members experienced in scouting. After months of planning, the building process began in mid-August.

The team helped prepare the site and install structures that would safely support student activities and withstand Michigan weather.

The ribbon cutting celebrated the project’s recent completion. DHMC students and staff recognized and thanked Cameron and his parents, Theresa and Kevin, for their contribution to the school. Two older siblings, Kaylyn and Kyle, who also attended DHMC, were present at the ceremony.

During the event, Cameron described the building process and materials used which included 45 yards of pea gravel and wood chips, 10- and 12-foot wooden posts anchored four feet in the ground, ropes, tires, and hardware.

He also gave helpful tips to students about how to use the low ropes course, which is now part of the school’s curriculum and under the supervision of physical education teacher Brett Rosbury.

Kabacinski ended his remarks by telling students how DHMC had given him a good foundation for high school and beyond. Now a junior at Greenhills High School in Ann Arbor, he looks forward to studying mechanical engineering in college. Until then, he is playing soccer and basketball, participating in a robotics club, and completing his requirements to become an Eagle Scout.

“We’re confident that the low ropes course is the start of many projects Cameron will be involved in that will benefit others,” Neff said. “He serves as a wonderful role model for our students. We are very impressed by his achievements thus far and are happy to have been a part of his education.”

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